• Sat. Oct 16th, 2021

Most current Health Problems

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The most important current health problems (and why they matter)

When thinking about the most serious health problems, there are various ways of looking at them. For instance, you might examine

  • the most common causes of death
  • the diseases and conditions of death people worry about the most
  • the causes of death that are somewhat unique to where you live.

These three lists are not the same. Let’s consider each.

According to the CDC, the top 10 causes of death and the maximum number of deaths each year in the U.S. are

  • heart disease: 610,000
  • cancer: 580,000
  • lung disease: 149,000
  • accidents: 131,000
  • stroke: 129,000
  • Alzheimer’s disease: 85,000
  • diabetes: 76,000
  • flu and pneumonia: 57,000
  • kidney disease: 47,000
  • suicide: 41,000

These numbers come from death certificates, and that suggests they are subject to some error. For instance, when a person in his 90s has many chronic diseases and “dies in his sleep,” the cause of death listed on the death certificate might be little more than a feeling.

Current health issues

Coronavirus COVID-19 Resource Center

While the COVID-19 pandemic proceeds to rage in parts of the world, it is slowly running in the U.S. There are presently three FDA-authorized vaccines, add one for children as young as 12. The vaccines are proving to be next as useful in the real world as they were in clinical cases. The CDC has relaxed some prevention measures, particularly for people who are fully vaccinated, and especially outdoors. While scientists proceed to explore treatments and to keep an eye on viral modifications

What’s different about your state?

A recent study examined the causes of death in each state, and for each named those that were significantly higher than the average elsewhere. For example, researchers found:

  • Accidental gun-related deaths: the rates of death due to accidental shooting were two to four times the national average in health issues in America Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia.
  • Deaths during an interaction with the police: rates were up to 3.5 times higher in California, Oregon, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah.
  • Deaths due to accidents involving machinery: rates were highest in Iowa and North Dakota.
  • Suicide: Oregon, New York, Minnesota, Colorado, and New Hampshire had the highest rates.
  • Bicycle-related deaths: these were most common in Florida.
  • Accidental suffocation: this occurred most often in Connecticut.

Sometimes the reasons for these findings are obvious. For example, it’s understandable (though unfortunate) that agricultural states such as Iowa and North Dakota might have a higher than normal rate of death due to devices, or that bicycle deaths might be most popular in a place like Florida where the weather enables year-round biking. Others, such as the rates of suicide, are more difficult to understand.

A separate study recently evaluated the least healthy cities in the U.S. Of the top 10 unhealthiest cities (or should we say bottom 10), all were in the southern states and most were rural. Subscribers to poor health in these cities were lack of support, need of access to healthcare, unhealthy diets, and almost high rates of deaths due to injury and drug treatment.

Why it matters

It’s not surprising that the top reasons for death might differ from place to place. But, that means that the steps we should take to improve our health may not be the same everywhere. It’s individually important to identify those diseases that we know can be stopped, slowed, or even changed with preventive care, changes in diet, medication, or exercise. Good examples add many cases of diabetes and heart disease.

While avoiding preventable death is an essential measure of health, it’s not the only one. Having a high quality of life matters as well — and some would say that quality of life is more valuable than how long it is. 

Current Health Issues

People with Certain Medical Conditions

Adults of any age with the following conditions can be more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19. Critical illness means that a person with COVID-19 may need:

 

  • Hospitalization
  • Intense care
  • A ventilator to help them breathe
  • Or they may even die

 

In addition:

 

  • More aged adults are more likely to make severely ill from COVID-19. More than 80% of COVID-19 deaths happen in people over age 65, and more than 95% of COVID-19 deaths happen in people more adult than 45.
  • Long-standing systemic health and social inequities have put different groups of people at developed risk of getting ill and dying from COVID-19, adds many racial and ethnic minority groups and people with injuries.

 

  • Studies have explained people from racial and ethnic minority groups are also dying from COVID-19 at younger ages. People in minority groups are usually younger when they produce chronic medical conditions and may be more inclined to have more than one condition.
  • People with disabilities are more likely than those without disadvantages to having chronic health conditions, live in a congregate setting, and face more barriers to healthcare. Studies have displayed that some people with sure disabilities are more likely to get COVID-19 and have worse outcomes.

 

If you have a medical condition, chat with your healthcare provider about steps you can take to maintain your health and risks.  

Defensive measures for COVID-19 (adds vaccination, wearing a mask, and social distancing) are necessary especially if you are older or have multiple or critical health conditions. You can learn about CDC’s COVID-19 vaccine support, including how medical conditions and other factors inform to support.


Note: The list here does not include all possible medical conditions that could make you more likely to get seriously ill. Rare medical conditions may not be adds below. But, a person with a condition that is not registered may yet be in more danger from COVID-19 than persons of related age who do not have the condition and should communicate with your healthcare provider.

Medical Conditions in Adults

  • This list is shown in alphabetical order and not in order of risk.
  • CDC began an evidence review method for each medical condition on this list to assure they met the guidelines for addition on this webpage.
  • We are seeing more about COVID-19 every day, and this list may be upgraded as the science develops.
current health problem

Cancer

Having cancer can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19. Treatments for many types of cancer can weaken your body’s capacity to fight off disease. At this time, based on ready studies, having a history of cancer may raise your risk.

current health problem

Chronic kidney disease

Having chronic kidney disease of any stage can give you more likely to get seriously sick from COVID-19.

Chronic lung diseases, including COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), asthma (moderate-to-severe), interstitial lung disease, cystic fibrosis, and pulmonary hypertension

Chronic lung diseases can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19. These diseases may add:

  • Asthma, if it’s easy to severe.
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), adds emphysema and chronic bronchitis
  • Having damaged or scarred lung tissue such as interstitial lung disease (adds idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis)
  • Cystic fibrosis, with or without lung or other solid organ transplantations
  • Pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lungs)
common health issues

Dementia or other neurological conditions

Having neurological conditions, such as madness, can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19.

current health problem

Chronic kidney disease

Having both type 1 or type 2 diabetes can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19.

current health problem

Dementia or other neurological conditions

Having Down syndrome can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19.

current health problem

Heart diseases (such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies, or hypertension)

Having heart diseases such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies, and possibly high blood pressure (hypertension) can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19.

current health problem

HIV infection

Having HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19.

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Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system)

Having a vulnerable immune system can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19. Many conditions and treatments can cause a person to be immunocompromised or have a vulnerable immune system. Primary immunodeficiency is the reason for genetic defects that can be obtained. Continued use of corticosteroids or other immune weakening medicines can start secondary or acquired immunodeficiency.

People who have a condition or are using medicines that weaken their immune system may not be fully protected even if they are fully vaccinated. They should proceed to take all care suggested for unvaccinated people, adds wearing a well-fitted mask till advised otherwise by their healthcare provider.

current health problem

Liver disease

Having chronic liver diseases, such as alcohol-related liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and particularly cirrhosis, or scarring of the liver, can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19.

current health problem

Overweight and obesity

Overweight (described as a body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg/m2 but < 30 kg/m2), obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2 but < 40 kg/m2), or severe obesity (BMI of ≥40 kg/m2), can give you more likely to make critically ill from COVID-19. The risk of critical COVID-19 illness increases clearly with high BMI.

current health problem

Pregnancy

Pregnant and newly pregnant people (for at least 42 days following the end of pregnancy) are more likely to take severely ill from COVID-19 compared with non-pregnant people.

current health problem

Sickle cell disease or thalassemia

Having hemoglobin blood disorders like sickle cell disease (SCD) or thalassemia can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19.

current health problem

Smoking, current or former

Being a current or former cigarette smoker can give you more likely to make you severely ill from COVID-19. If you currently smoke, stop. If you used to smoke, don’t start again. If you’ve never smoked, don’t begin.

current health problem

Solid-organ or blood stem cell transplant

Having had a solid organ or blood stem cell transplant, which adds bone marrow transplants, can give you more likely to take you seriously ill from COVID-19.

current health problem

Stroke or cerebrovascular disease, which affects blood flow to the brain

Having cerebrovascular disease, such as having a stroke, can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19.

current health problem

Substance use disorders

Having a material use disorder (such as alcohol, opioid, or cocaine use disorder) can give you more likely to get seriously ill from COVID-19.

Information on Children and Teens

During children have been less affected by COVID-19 compared with adults, children can be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and some children develop serious illness. Children with underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness related to children without underlying medical conditions. Current data on which underlying medical conditions in children are connected with improved risk is limited. Current evidence recommends that children with medical complexity, genetic, neurologic, metabolic conditions, or natural heart disease can be at increased risk for critical illness from COVID-19. Related to adults, children with obesity, diabetes, asthma or chronic lung disease, sickle cell disease, or immunosuppression can also be at increased risk for critical illness from COVID-19. One way to defend the health of children is to assure that all adults in a household are fully vaccinated against COVID-19.